©Catherine MacGregor

©Catherine MacGregor

Protected names directory

The importance of clarity in cattle breeding is important today for various reasons. New families have come in from Canada and, with the added tools of EBVs and genetic profiling, breeders need to know as much as possible about their blood lines. The other reason is that for some breeders they feel they are protecting a very important part of our heritage. That is the reason for having what are known as ‘protected’ names. These are the names of Shorthorn families that cannot be used to describe animals that are not of that family. For example, you cannot call a heifer calf out of a Barrington (Bates) a Victoria (Booth); Barrington and Victoria are protected names.

 

 
 

A

Acomb
Augusta
Averne
Avalanche

B

Barrington
Bates
Bellona
Blythsome
Bracelet
Brawith Bud
Bridekirk
Bryte
Bryte Eyes
Broadhooks
Booths
Butterfly

C

Charity
Charlotte Corday
Charmer
Clipper
Cran
Cressida

D

Darlington
Duchess of Airdrie
Duchess of Lancaster


F

Foggathorpe
Furbelow

G

Goldie
Grana Uile
Grand Duchess
Greenleaf
Groat
Gwynne Pye

J

Jenny Lind
Jealousy
Jilt
Johnby Rose

K

Kilblean Beauty
Kirklevington

L

Lady Derwent
Lady Dorothy
Lady Fawsley
Lady Nottingham
Lady Windsor
Lancaster
Laurestina
Lavender
Luxury

M

Mantalini
Millicent
Missie

N

Nelly Lee
Nonpareil

O

Orange Blossom
Oxford

P

Pink
Princess Royal

Q

Queen of Rothes

R

Ramsden
Rosewood
Rothes
Ringlet

S

Secret
Seraphina
Sharon Rose
Somerset

T

Telluria
Thorndale

U

Undine
Ury Maid

V

W

Waterloo
Wildair
Wildeyes

 
 

The purpose of pedigrees is obviously to inform about the breeding of all calves in Coates’s Herd Book. It is true that many breeders pay far less attention to pedigrees but you cannot rely entirely on your eye. There are many families that have played an important part in Shorthorn history. Some are families refined by Thomas Bates for their milk, such as protected families including Duchess, Waterloo, Wild Eyes, Millicent, Greenleaf, Oxford, Furbelow, Seraphina, Barrington, Gypsy, Countess, Baroness, Foggathorpe and Rose.

On the beef side there are the families developed by the Booth family in the early part of the 19th century for their depth of flesh. These families were so successful that they were exported all over the world to improve the native cattle. These cattle included protected families such as Queen of Rothes, Nonpareil, Luxury, Lovely, Lavender, Pye, Pure Gold, Maid Ramsden, Rosewood, Augusta, Broadhooks, Wimple, Beauty, Clipper, Floss, Pauline, Averne, Marigold, Missie, Bright, Princess Royal, Lancasters, Jilt, Blythesome, Maud, Orange Blossom, Princess and Victoria. There will be some others that along with some of these have died out. Some will have died out because they lost their identity and others because they were no good or were exported.